Student Wellbeing

Student Wellbeing

The inspiration for our care of students, staff and other members of the St. Cecilia’s community is drawn from the life of Jesus.

In the person of Jesus we see the expression of love, compassion, reconciliation and justice and the awareness of what it means to be fully human.  Student Wellbeing aims to emulate these qualities in order to nourish, support and empower all members of the community.

The emotional and physical wellbeing of our students is pivotal to their success at school, as adolescents, and in their future lives.  Physically and emotionally healthy students are happy, able to deal positively with life’s challenges, experience a sense of connectedness with the school and others, and are well placed to develop into well-balanced and successful young adults.  (Department of Education and Early Childhood Development – DEECD 2004 Wellbeing Policy)

Catholic schools are concerned with the fostering of students’ self discipline. At the heart of this endeavor is the development of persons “who are responsible and inner directed, capable of choosing freely in conformity with their conscience”   The Catholic School, Section 31

Wellbeing also contributes to students recognising that their fundamental freedoms and rights are reciprocated by responsibilities.  Catholic Education Commission of Victoria Policy 1.14, p.6

St Cecilia’s School does not permit corporal punishment.

 

Aims

  • To establish and maintain an environment which is conducive to learning.
  • To foster self discipline in students
  • To build a school environment based on positive behaviour, mutual respect and cooperation.
  • To establish well understood and logical consequences for student behaviour.
RIGHTS RESPONSIBILITIES
At St Cecilia’s we believe that everyone has the right to The responsibilities that we have to make certain that these rights are upheld are
feel safe and be safe to ensure the safety of others
learn not interrupt when people are doing their work
be respected respect others and their property
enjoy being at school allow others to enjoy school
have and express an opinion respect the opinions of others

Implementation

  • We will encourage and provide opportunities for ongoing communication between parents and teachers through formal and informal meetings
  • We will reflect upon our own practices to ensure the safety, rights and responsibilities of all students are catered for.
  • We will endeavour to build positive rapport within the school and the wider community.
Steps to be implemented relating to misbehaviour in the Classroom

We will acknowledge good role models through praise, positive reinforcement, public acclamation, rewards and certificates.

Both teachers and students have important roles to play in maintaining effective discipline.”

There are four overriding considerations when using this model:  Be courteous; Avoid conflict; Accept the student, reject the behaviour; Make the student accept what happens as a consequence of misbehaviour

The following model is to be used only for a student who is disruptive and does not obey classroom and school rules

Step 1  Look at what you, the teacher, are doing and examine the effectiveness of your present procedure.

Step 2  Give up whatever doesn’t work

Step 3   Do something positive when student is not causing disruption by using praise or some other strategy

Step 4  If a student disrupts say QUICKLY and DEFINITELY to the student “What are you doing?”  A solution will be sought to the problem.  If the student does not stop the behaviour or answers negatively or inappropriately then move to the next step

Step 5  Repeat and/or add second questions, “What should you be doing?”  This presupposes that the student clearly knows and understands the rights and responsibilities of the school.  If no response to the above questions, say “This is what I saw you doing and you need to be…” eg:  you need to be speak to others respectfully (This reinforces the Rights and Responsibilities of the school)

Step 6  Repeat Step 4 and Step 5 and if necessary say “We’ve got to work this out”  (Try to work it out immediately).  If unsuccessful move to Step 7.

Step 7  Isolate the student within the classroom away from others and tell them to remain quiet.  This enables the student to remain in the classroom as a passive listener.  The student stays in this place until they are ready to work the situation out.  If the disruptive behaviour continues then go to Step 8.

Step 8  Apply ‘time out’.  Send the student to the principal office or student wellbeing office (if the principal is unavailable).  The principal will be fully aware of the problem at this stage.  The principal will deal with each of these incidents on an individual basis and the student may be expected to remain isolated for half a day and an acceptable behaviour agreement will be discussed by the principal with the student. The student will not be allowed to return to the classroom until they have made a commitment to behave and act appropriately.  During the “time out” the student will have a separate recess and lunch break.

Step 9  The principal will contact the parents and the student will be sent home if the misbehaviour continues.  When the student returns they will be placed on a behaviour modification contract.

Step 10  If all fails, the student’s parents will become fully involved in conjunction with a community agency or counsellor to help with the problem.

In Summary

The following are the established protocols using the above method if the school rules are broken and/or there are constant behaviour issues:

  1. What are you doing?  What should you be doing?  A solution will be sought to the problem.
  2. If the behaviour continues repeat step 1.
  3. If unsuccessful isolate the student within the classroom away from others.
  4. If the disruptive behaviour continues apply time out.  Don’t send the student to the office but ring for assistance.
  5. The principal will deal with each of these incidents on an individual basis and the student may be expected to remain isolated for half a day and an acceptable behaviour agreement will be discussed by the principal with the student. The student will not be allowed to return to the classroom until they have made a commitment to behave and act appropriately.  During the “time out” the student will have a separate recess and lunch break.

The above steps will be discussed and displayed in all classrooms

Steps to be implemented following a serious incident

We will acknowledge good role models through praise, positive reinforcement, public acclamation, rewards and certificates.

In some instances, the serious nature of the behaviour will require additional responses. Definition of a serious offence is when:

  1. The behaviour seriously undermines the ethos of St Cecilia’s School; or
  2. The individual consistently and deliberately fails to comply with any reasonable request of a principal or teacher; or
  3. The individual is offensive or dangerous to the physical or emotional health of any staff member or any student; or
  4. The individual consistently or deliberately interferes with the educational opportunities of other students.

Special Needs

At times, alteration to this procedure will be applied for those students with identified special needs. Special needs refers to those students who have individual strategies for behavioural management developed through the Student Support Group. These procedures would apply to both inside and outside behaviour.

Remediation

Dealing with individual students may require an Individual Learning Plan (ILP), Program Support Group (PSG) meeting or professional intervention in the form of counselling or other student services. Some services that may be offered are:

  • School Counsellors
  • Behavioural Assessment (Catholic Education Office)
  • Catholic Family Services, Student and Family Counselling Unit (Centacare)
  • Other professional agencies as required

The Student Wellbeing Coordinator will coordinate these referrals. Communication and collaboration with parents of both the perpetrator(s) and the victim(s) will be maintained throughout the process. Some students may need individual behaviour management programs overseen by the Student Wellbeing coordinator. The scope of these programs may range from individually based strategies to group programs.

Evaluation

This policy has been revised in June 2012 and will be reviewed as part of the school’s three year review process.